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to brownsville. everyone in this chamber will miss her. i know i speak for all of my colleagues when i michigan wish kay bailey -- when i wish kay billy hutchison the i have best in the next exciting chapter of her life. i join with my colleagues in saying to you, via condios. mr. hatch: mr. president, i want to join in thanking kay for her great service here in the united states snavment i've worked very closely with her on a wide variety of issues and i have to say there's no more fires advocate. in fact, i have to say that all of our women senators are fierce advocates and we've been greatly benefited by having them herement and kay has parved the way for -- has paved the way for autumn in of senators, both male and fe female, to become better senators. kay bailey hutch song is a great senator. she worked her guts out the whole time she was here -- and she's still here, but she's going to retire this time. and she represented texas well. and all i can say is that she's been my friend all this time, and when i needed help from her, she was always there. i tried to be there for her when she ne
at that time. i took a look at it and when i got into the hospital in michigan, one of the fellows i met was modeled -- bob dole and we became good friends even to this day. i asked him what are your plans. and he, without hesitating, said i'm going to be a clerk. after that i'm going to run for the state house, first opening in the commerce. that's where i'm going. i figured that's a good idea. so i went to law school and became assistant prosecutor when the territorial losses became available i ran for that office and when the state could came along i got to congress a little ahead of bob. >> you were in the territorial legislature then before you came here. >> two terms in the house and in the senate. >> and then came here as a member of the house and who did you come here without that time? >> only one member of that time. >> you mentioned senator dole and the fact you were then in the hospital with him in michigan. it's amazing that some of these friendships were formed long before any public service. he talks about being a friend of -- excuse me, the senator from wyoming, al simpso
dingell, democrat from michigan and he has been serving since 1955. previouslpreviousl y his father sanded -- served in the same congressional district until his father died in the sun ran and took his place. dingell is, used to be thought of as illiberal and no one thinks of him as a liberal and certainly the democrats don't because they marginalize him. and yet thank you has proven and i show it throughout the book that even with the democrats in the minority and even with him being removed from the pecking order power, they want to get things done. this why the guy knows how to pull strings on behalf of the district to get parts appropriated to get bills passed and he passed his pipeline safety bill which is essentially a regulation bill during the tea party congress. it's almost unheard of, but dingell is i think a dying breed. his philosophy is, you govern from the center. you begin writing a bill from the center which means you bring everybody on board, put them in a room and talk about what they like. it's not the way it works in today zero some policy where their idea now the rep
from michigan. ms. stabenow: thank you, madam president. the presiding officer: we are in a quorum call. ms. stabenow: i would ask suspension of the quorum call. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. stabenow: thank you. madam president, i rise today to once again speak about the fact that in july -- july 25 of this year, the senate passed a middle-class tax cut bill guaranteeing that the first $250,000 of income that any american has would be exempted from any tax increase. now, we all know that the vast majority -- in fact, 98% of americans -- make less than that amount of money. so we are talking about 98% of americans receiving tax cuts under that proposal. back in july, we passed this proposal, and it is now still waiting in the house of representatives. so far the house leadership has refused to even let the bill come up for a vote, even though we all know that there are a majority of members in the house that would vote for this and guarantee that, as we go into christmas, middle-class families across america would know that they would have $2,200 in their pocket, more in
was pulling miserably. even in michigan, people did not want to intervene to save the auto industry. he had a lengthy meeting with the odd note team -- with the auto team. i reported on the pulling and he said, look, i completely understand what people feel that way. but if we don't do anything, we will lose an iconic american institution and a million jobs will go with it in the midst of the worst recession since the great depression. so we need to get them to rationalize the industry can get them to make cars for the 21st century. we have to make that shot. and he did. i think the results are clear now. on health care, i can categorically report you that there was not anybody who was telling him that taking on health care was a good political issue. we knew even in the campaign, in the general election of 2008, what a difficult issue was. we took the offensive on it. the president said we have been trying to solve this problem for 60 years. if we do not do it in the first two years, it will never get done. we're not here to husband their popularity and admire it on the shelf. we're here t
in michigan and he meets up with bob dole. the two of them nowhere near politics. both of them so wounded and talked all the time in that hospital about what they would do in the future. both wanted to be doctors but both so harmed that being a doctor was, at that point, just completely out of the question. they had to come up with other careers and i talked with both of them about their relationship a while back and they describe that time in the hospital. take a listen. >> i used to watch him play bridge. he was the best bridge player in the hospital. we sat around and talked about what we were going to do with the rest of our life. i said, bob, what are you going to be doing? and one thing about bob dole, he had had his life mapped out. really mapped out. he says, well, when i get back, i'll be a county attorney. then i'll be in the legislature. the first opening of congress, that's where i'll go. i said, gee, that's a good idea. >> inouye actually beat dole and said, i'm here in the congress, where are you? dole joined him and later were both world war ii heroes. this is a generation
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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